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Pablo

Pablo is the home of the government offices of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The town was named for Michel Pablo, a Flathead chief and a rancher and stockman. Pablo was one of the first to raise buffalo and is credited for saving the bison from extinction.

Sam Walking Coyote, was a young Pend d’Orielle living among the Salish. While hunting with the Blackfeet in Milk River country, he married a Blackfeet woman. No problem, except that he already had a wife on the Flathead reservation. Tribal rules were pretty strict about polygamy. To atone for his sins, he trained six bison calves to follow his horse and brought them into the Mission Valley as a peace offering. As he resumed his life among the Salish, his herd grew to almost 300 animals. In 1884 he decided to sell them to Pablo and another rancher named Charles Allard for $3,000. He took the money to Missoula where he literally had the party of his life. He was found murdered under the Higgins Street Bridge after several days of revelry, his money gone. His herd was the nucleus for the herd that now roams the National Bison Range in Moiese.

Excerpted from "The Ultimate Montana Atlas and Travel Encyclopedia".

On This Date in Montana: October 18, 1935

The capitol city of Helena is jolted by a severe earthquake measuring 6.3 on the Richter scale. Four people are killed. Property damage is estimated at $3.5 million in the midst of the Great Depression. The buildings of the Intermountain Union College and the brand-new high school suffer severe damage. More than 1,100 homes were damaged as well as the train station and city hall. Extensive damage is reported throughout the Helena area. The quake was felt as far away as Spokane. Two weeks later, a second earthquake hits causing even more damage. Montanan’s didn’t lose their sense of humor through the tragedy. The Bozeman newspaper reported "Helena is now called Lena. This was due, they say, not so much to the leaning tendency, but because the quakes have shaken the Hel out of it."

Excerpted from "The Ultimate Montana Atlas and Travel Encyclopedia".

Copyright © 2003 Michael Dougherty. Use of this material for radio and television programs, printed media, webcasting, and any other source of mass dissemination is prohibited without permission of the publisher.

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