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Ghost Towns

Ghost Towns

Montana's Ghost Towns are like stepping back in time to the era of gold!

Montana's Ghost Towns are like stepping back in time to the era of gold!

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1. Adobetown

 Virginia City, Butte Area
Placer riches in Alder Gulch spawned many colorful communities. Among them, Adobetown flourished briefly as the center of mining activity in 1864. In that year alone, miners extracted over $350,000 in gold from nearby streams. More Info
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2. Bannack Historical Marker

 Dillon, Butte Area
The Lewis and Clark Expedition, westward bound, passed here in August 1805. The old mining camp of Bannack is on Grasshopper Creek about twenty miles west of here. More Info
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3. Lewistown Ghost Town Tour

 Lewistown, Central Montana
Begin by driving east on Hwy.. 87 approximately 12 miles to the Cheadle turnoff and go north approximately 7 miles to the town of Gilt Edge. More Info
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4. Georgetown Lake

 Anaconda, Butte Area
Georgetown Lake, well-known for its superb fishing and stunning grandeur. More Info
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5. Elling Bank

 Virginia City, Butte Area
Bankers Nowland and Weary set up business in this brick-veneered building, one of the town’s oldest stone structures, in 1864. More Info
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6. Montana City Old Town

 Libby, Northwest Montana
Revisit Libby’s history by visiting Montana City Old Town. More Info
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7. Virginia City

 Virginia City, Butte Area
All of Montana has the deepest pride and affection for Virginia City. No more colorful pioneer mining camp ever existed. More Info
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8. Keystone Mines

 Yaak, Northwest Montana
A good deal of gold was produced here although it was never a major strike. More Info
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9. Metropolitan Meat Market

 Virginia City, Butte Area
George Gohn was one of the first to arrive at Alder Gulch in 1863 where he and Conrad Kohrs set up a meat market in a log cabin. More Info
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10. Nevada City

 Nevada City, Butte Area
A ghost town now, but once one of the hell roarin’ mining camps that lined Alder Gulch in the 1860s. More Info
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11. Pfouts & Russel (Rank's Drug-Old Masonic Temple)

 Virginia City, Butte Area
Paris Pfouts, Vigilante president, and Virginia City’s first mayor was instrumental in laying out the town. More Info
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12. Independence Ghost Town

 Big Timber, Livingston Area
It’s a little challenging to get to the mine shafts, cabins, and brothels that still stand here. You might even see an occasional moose, elk, deer, or grizzly bear. More Info
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13. Castle Ghost Town

 Castle Town, Central Montana
The town tucked away under the Castle Mountains started in 1882, and mushroomed as a silver camp during the next few years. More Info
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14. Pioneer Ghost Town and Museum

 Scobey, Northeast Montana
Pioneer was built in 1862 before the Gold Creek placers were abandoned for the big strike in Bannack. More Info
Closed
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15. Elkhorn Ghost Town State Park

 Boulder, Helena Area
Wander through a once-thriving silver mining town. Booming in 1870, Elkhorn, with only a few residents, is now considered a ghost town by many. Many of the original buildings are still intact though they are privately owned. More Info
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16. Argenta Ghost Town

 Argenta, Butte Area
Argenta (formerly Montana) was the site of Montana’s first silver-lead mine in Montana, The Legal Tender. It once had a population of over 1,500. More Info
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17. Southern Cross Ghost Town

 Anaconda, Butte Area
This once busy gold and silver mining town settled by Swedish and Finnish immigrants in the 1860s continued operations for eighty years. More Info
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18. Red Lion Ghost Town

 Anaconda, Butte Area
There are still a few log cabins and tramway towers, mixed with some beautiful scenery that was once home to about 500 in the early 1900s. The town dates back to 1875 when gold was discovered in the area. More Info
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19. Diamond City Ghost Town

 Diamond City, Helena Area
Diamond City, which emerged in Confederate Gulch on the east side of present-day Canyon Ferry Lake, was the hub of the area’s gold activity and became one of Montana Territory’s most populated early communities. More Info
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20. Comet Ghost Town

 Comet, Helena Area
Many of the buildings are still standing. Like many of Montana’s ghost towns, Comet was once vandalized by treasure-seekers who have spoiled much of the historic longevity of these wonderful buildings. More Info
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21. Cable Ghost Camp

 Montana, Butte Area
Some say that the world’s largest gold nugget was found here and bought by W.A. Clark for $19,000. More Info
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22. Parrot Ghost Camp

 Whitehall, Butte Area
A few building foundations are the only reminders that the town of Parrot stood on the banks of the Jefferson River south of Whitehall back in the 1890s. More Info
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23. Gold Creek Ghost Town

 Garrison, Southwest Montana
Some consider this the site of the first discovery of gold in Montana. Very little remains of the town and most information has been found in the diaries of two brothers, More Info
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24. Granite Ghost Town

 Philipsburg, Butte Area
This remote, difficult-to-reach ghost town is “rich” in mining history. For adventurous history buffs, this small park preserves an evocative fragment of the past—the “superintendent’s house” and the ruins of an old miner’s union hall. More Info
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25. St. Marie Ghost Town

 Saint Marie, Northeast Montana
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26. Bear Mouth Ghost Town

 Clinton, Southwest Montana
Bear Mouth was a stopover point for stagecoaches and depended on the survival of other towns that were mining camps. More Info
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27. Coolidge Ghost Town

 Polaris, Southwest Montana
Coolidge was founded in 1911 with the construction of the Elkhorn Mine. The mine was the hub of a large mining operation that was started by former Lieutenant Governor, William Allen. More Info
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28. Old Chico Ghost Town

 Pray, Livingston Area
Chico began as a mining camp when a group of miners moved up the gulch from Yellowstone City. Some of them took up farming. It wasn’t a fun place to live for the early families there. More Info
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29. Rimini Ghost Camp

 Rimini, Helena Area
Rimini is still home to a few residents. Many of the original buildings are still standing and some in good condition thanks to the care given by the residents who live in them. Porphyry Dike Mine is also nearby. More Info
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30. Glendale Ghost Town

 Dillon, Butte Area
To reach this town, take Trapper Creek Road west out of Melrose for about 15 miles. This was the largest of several towns in the Bryant Mining District. More Info
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31. Wickes Ghost Camp

 Wickes, Helena Area
Remains of huge smelters and refineries are all that are left in the ghost town of Wickes. Once a thriving mining town that produced $50,000,000 in gold and silver. More Info

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