Geyser

This town began as an overnight stop on the stage route from Lewistown to Great Falls. It later became a railroad stop when the Great Northern was built from Billings to Great Falls. This area at the turn of the century was primarily a sheep ranching area dominated by the J. B. Long Sheep Company. Homesteaders, mainly Finnish, flooded the area lured here by offers of free land. The town got its name from a nearby bubbling mud springs. The geysers were most active during the dry years of the 1930s but dried up when the rains returned and never came back.

This area at the turn of the century was primarily a sheep ranching area dominated by the J. B. Long Sheep Company. Homesteaders, mainly Finnish, flooded the area lured here by offers of free land. The town got its name from a nearby bubbling mud springs. The geysers were most active during the dry years of the 1930s but dried up when the rains returned and never came back.

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