Winston Montana

Winston

Winston was platted by the Northern Pacific Railroad and soon settled by ranchers and farmers. It began with Fred Goudy’s Saloon and was followed by the Duncan Hotel, a combined rooming house, and restaurant. The Dodge brothers operated a rooming house in a rock building which, deserted and crumbling, stands today. Gold, silver, copper, and lead mines were active in the area from 1908–1918 and 1926–1928. Winston was named for P. B. Winston, a contractor for the Northern Pacific Railroad.

One of Winston’s most notable characters was George Beatty, a young New York man who was “doomed to die” presumably from tuberculosis. He set out for Montana in the 1860s hoping the mountain air would add a couple of years to his life. He was so resolved to his fate that he brought his tombstone with him. Carved on it was:

My mother’s prayers kept me out of Hell.

Thank God for a blessed hope beyond the grave.

Beatty stored the tombstone in a back shed. When he died at the ripe old age of ninety-two, it was placed on his grave in Helena where it can be seen today.

 

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